Integrated Land and Resource Governance II (ILRG II) Quarterly Progress Report: Sept.-Dec. 2023

ILRG2 QPR Y1Q1 cover imageThe launch of ILRG II during this past quarter was primarily focused on clarifying project objectives, advancing early contract deliverables, and carrying out initial engagements with project partners, while the core team associated with ILRG II (both within Tetra Tech and USAID) finished completing close out tasks under the predecessor ILRG contract. As ILRG II considered multiple, multi-year activity development and start-up ideas for the coming six months, ILRG II and USAID communicated frequently to ensure common prioritization. During this quarter, ILRG II’s contracting office (CO) management moved to the Office of Acquisition and Assistance division that supports the Bureau for Resilience, Environment and Food Security, and a dedicated CO has not yet been assigned to the contract.

By the end of the quarter, ILRG II had initiated implementation of the IPARD evaluation, as well as confirmed two countries for long-term implementation (with progress on a third). The ILRG II team was able to meet with each of its core subcontractors who were actively engaged in two start-up workshops with USAID and work planning. The primary challenge of this quarter was associated with starting up ILRG II while completing final deliverables and close out tasks under ILRG.

Quarterly Activity Progress Report No. 15, Quarter 1, Fiscal Year 2023 (Oct. 1 – Dec. 31, 2022)

Introduction

A group of men and women holding certificates in their hands are gathered for a group photo.United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/Ethiopia contracted Tetra Tech as the prime contractor to implement the five-year Feed the Future Ethiopia Land Governance Activity (LGA) Task Order under the Strengthening Tenure and Resource Rights II (STARR II) Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) Contract. Tetra Tech will implement the LGA over a five-year period from May 2019 to May 2024. This Quarterly Report No. 15 summarizes implementation progress made during the period of October 1 – December 31, 2022 (Quarter 1, FY 2023).

LGA’s purpose is to support the Government of Ethiopia (GOE), its regions, and citizens to strengthen land governance, increase incomes, reduce conflict, and support well-planned urbanization, thereby contributing to the country’s Ten-Year Development Plan. To help achieve these goals, LGA is implementing interventions under two components:

Component 1: Strengthening the land governance system

1. Facilitate policy reforms and strengthen land administration and land use institutions by promoting structural reforms of rural and urban institutions and the land information system.
2. Improve technical capacity for suitable land administration and land use planning activities to address emerging issues, such as urbanization, industrialization, and youth.
3. Conduct policy-oriented research on land governance and provide scalable solutions to improve land governance.

Component 2: Expanding communal land tenure security in pastoral areas

1. Expand communal land tenure security in pastoral areas through improved policy and legal reform.
2. For pastoral community lands, develop a scalable approach for land demarcation, registration, and certification in collaboration with community institutions.

Quarterly Activity Progress Report No. 14, Quarter 4, Fiscal Year 2022 (Jul. 1 – Sept. 30, 2022)

Introduction

A large group is seated under a tree, watching several speakers.United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/Ethiopia contracted Tetra Tech as the prime contractor to implement the five-year Feed the Future Ethiopia Land Governance Activity (LGA) Task Order under the Strengthening Tenure and Resource Rights II (STARR II) Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) Contract. Tetra Tech will implement the LGA over a five-year period from May 2019 to May 2024. This Quarterly Report No. 14 summarizes implementation progress made during the period of July 1 – September 30, 2022 (Quarter 4, FY 2022).

LGA’s purpose is to support the Government of Ethiopia (GOE), its regions, and citizens to strengthen land governance, increase incomes, reduce conflict, and support well-planned urbanization, thereby contributing to the country’s Ten-Year Development Plan. To help achieve these goals, LGA is implementing interventions under two components:

Component 1: Strengthening the land governance system

1. Facilitate policy reforms and strengthen land administration and land use institutions by promoting structural reforms of rural and urban institutions and the land information system.
2. Improve technical capacity for suitable land administration and land use planning activities to address emerging issues, such as urbanization, industrialization, and youth.
3. Conduct policy-oriented research on land governance and provide scalable solutions to improve land governance.

Component 2: Expanding communal land tenure security in pastoral areas

1. Expand communal land tenure security in pastoral areas through improved policy and legal reform.
2. For pastoral community lands, develop a scalable approach for land demarcation, registration, and certification in collaboration with community institutions.

Quarterly Activity Progress Report No. 13, Quarter 3, Fiscal Year 2022 (Apr. 1 – June 30, 2022)

Introduction

A man watches over a large herd of camels in a field..United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/Ethiopia contracted Tetra Tech as the prime contractor to implement the five-year Feed the Future Ethiopia Land Governance Activity (LGA) Task Order under the Strengthening Tenure and Resource Rights II (STARR II) Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) Contract. Tetra Tech will implement the LGA over a five-year period from May 2019 to May 2024. This Quarterly Report No. 13 summarizes implementation progress made during the period of April 1 – June 30, 2022 (Quarter 3, FY 2022).

LGA’s purpose is to support the Government of Ethiopia (GOE), its regions, and citizens to strengthen land governance, increase incomes, reduce conflict, and support well-planned urbanization, thereby contributing to the country’s Ten-Year Development Plan. To help achieve these goals, LGA will implement activities under two components:

Component 1: Strengthening the land governance system

1. Facilitate policy reforms and strengthen land administration and land use institutions by promoting structural reforms of rural and urban institutions and the land information system.
2. Improve technical capacity for suitable land administration and land use planning activities to address emerging issues, such as urbanization, industrialization, and youth.
3. Conduct policy-oriented research on land governance and provide scalable solutions to improve land governance.

Component 2: Expanding communal land tenure security in pastoral areas

1. Expand communal land tenure security in pastoral areas through improved policy and legal reform.
2. For pastoral community lands, develop a scalable approach for land demarcation, registration, and certification in collaboration with community institutions.

Quarterly Activity Progress Report No. 12, Quarter 2, Fiscal Year 2022 (Jan. 1 – Mar. 31, 2022)

Introduction

Several men look on as a man with a pointer motions to a particular area of a map hung on an outdoor wall.United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/Ethiopia contracted Tetra Tech as the prime contractor to implement the five-year Feed the Future Ethiopia Land Governance Activity (LGA) Task Order under the Strengthening Tenure and Resource Rights II (STARR II) Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) Contract. Tetra Tech will implement the LGA over a five-year period from May 2019 to May 2024. This Quarterly Report No. 12 summarizes implementation progress made during the period of January 1 – March 31, 2022 (Quarter 2, FY 2022).

LGA’s purpose is to support the Government of Ethiopia (GOE), its regions, and citizens to strengthen land governance, increase incomes, reduce conflict, and support well-planned urbanization, thereby contributing to the country’s Ten-Year Development Plan. To help achieve these goals, LGA will implement activities under two components:

Component 1: Strengthening the land governance system

1. Facilitate policy reforms and strengthen land administration and land use institutions by promoting structural reforms of rural and urban institutions and the land information system.
2
. Improve technical capacity for suitable land administration and land use planning activities to address emerging issues, such as urbanization, industrialization, and youth.
3. Conduct policy-oriented research on land governance and provide scalable solutions to improve land governance.

Component 2: Expanding communal land tenure security in pastoral areas

1. Expand communal land tenure security in pastoral areas through improved policy and legal reform.
2. For pastoral community lands, develop a scalable approach for land demarcation, registration, and certification in collaboration with community institutions.

Quarterly Activity Progress Report No. 11, Quarter 1, Fiscal Year 2022 (Oct. 1 – Dec. 31, 2021)

Introduction

A large herd of goats walks down a dirt road toward the photographer.United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/Ethiopia contracted Tetra Tech as the prime contractor to implement the five-year Feed the Future Ethiopia Land Governance Activity (LGA) Task Order under the Strengthening Tenure and Resource Rights II (STARR II) Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) Contract. Tetra Tech will implement the LGA over a five-year period from May 2019 to May 2024. This Quarterly Report No. 11 summarizes implementation progress made during the period of October 1- December 31, 2021 (Quarter 1, FY 2022).

LGA’s purpose is to support the Government of Ethiopia (GOE), its regions, and citizens to strengthen land governance, increase incomes, reduce conflict, and support well-planned urbanization, thereby contributing to the country’s Ten-Year Development Plan. To help achieve these goals, LGA will implement activities under two components:

Component 1: Strengthening the land governance system

1. Facilitate policy reforms and strengthen land administration and land use institutions by promoting structural reforms of rural and urban institutions and the land information system.
2. Improve technical capacity for suitable land administration and land use planning activities to address emerging issues, such as urbanization, industrialization, and youth.
3. Conduct policy-oriented research on land governance and provide scalable solutions to improve land governance.

Component 2: Expanding communal land tenure security in pastoral areas

1. Expand communal land tenure security in pastoral areas through improved policy and legal reform.
2. For pastoral community lands, develop a scalable approach for land demarcation, registration, and certification in collaboration with community institutions.

Integrated Land and Resource Governance (ILRG) Quarterly Report April – June 2023

Key Accomplishments and Challenges

Mozambique: During this quarter, service providers continued to complete land documentation exercises, as well as association capacity strengthening and work to deepen gender impacts. ILRG received approval to extend support to district government associated with disaster risk reduction exercises in Buzi and Nhamatanda Districts. Partners in Quelimane adapted their program to respond to the negative impacts of cyclone Freddy. At the end of the Quarter, the ILRG Chief of Party and USAID Washington and Mozambique staff carried out a site visit to partners across Zambezia, Nampula and Sofala Provinces including beneficiary communities. ILRG partner, Terra Firma, engaged with the government departments around the development and use of a geoportal that will, once published, allow for community land delimitations to be broadly visible. This resulted in the signing of a
memorandum of understanding. Towards the end of the quarter a draft land law was released and partners were mobilized to provide input to the bill and participate in upcoming consultations to be organized by USAID/Mozambique’s SPEED program.

Zambia: ILRG closed down its offices this quarter and focused on completing work with grantee and subcontractors. ILRG shared governance and leadership manuals with partners and completed trainings with the Department of National Parks, and the Forestry Department on women’s leadership and empowerment, as well as the development of Community Forest Management Groups. During the quarter, ILRG hosted a short visit of women community scouts with the US Second Gentleman of the US, Doug Emhoff. ILRG supported the finalization of the Community-based Natural Resource Management Policy, including its Implementation Plan, as well as a final training curriculum for the Chunga Wildlife Training School. ILRG’s final event brought together stakeholders from across the country, including nine traditional leaders, generally indicating the strong support from across civil society, private sector and customary authorities for the work, as well as support from some champions within government.

Ghana Deforestation-Free Cocoa: This activity has been completed, though ILRG Program Officer visited communities that had participated in the Payment for Environmental Services approach to
monitor impacts.

India: ILRG continued to support women farmers during the peak potato season and harvest. ILRG provided agronomy training to women farmers in 11 communities and supported PepsiCo agronomists delivering training to women independently in 37 communities. ILRG delivered land literacy training to men and women farmers and supported land record updating. ILRG provided ongoing support to seven women’s land leasing groups and 11 women-led demonstration farms, organizing Farmers’ Field Days for men and women farmers. Women Community Agronomists and Field Agronomists received refresher training on gender equality and data collection. Despite challenges with seed quality across West Bengal this season, the yield was satisfactory. As this is the final year of intervention, this quarter ILRG focused on data collection, including a post-season survey with women farmers, and collecting qualitative data with men and women farmers, aggregators, and PepsiCo staff. A final event was held in May with representatives from PepsiCo global and India teams and USAID Washinton and included visits to communities and a reflection event in Kolkata. The final business case analysis was shared and followed by a policy-level meeting in the PepsiCo India office in Delhi for decision-making on sustainability and scalability.

Liberia: ILRG grantee, Foundation for Community Initiatives (FCI), supported eight communities in Grand Bassa and Bong Counties to adopt land and resource bylaws and elect leadership of their Community Land and Resource Development Committees. Work continues in the community lands protection process to map the community boundaries.

Malawi: ILRG completed field work in Malawi in March 2023. Under the 13-month project, ILRG and the Government of Malawi Land Reform Implementation Unit (LRIU) registered 8,392 household parcels: 4 percent registered jointly, 32 percent registered to men only, and 24 percent to women only. The Mwansambo land clerk continues to carry out certificate distribution, with 5,382 certificates (~60 percent) distributed to date in 14 GVHs. ILRG is working with the LRIU to try to push for a realistic timeline to complete certificate distribution, hopefully ahead of the virtual final learning event currently planned for August 15. ILRG’s field coordinator went back to Mwansambo from June 9-15 for a follow up visit to collect photos and stories and assess what elements of the work are having a lasting impact. Encouragingly, ILRG found some continuity of community structures since the project left, and community members were excited to receive their certificates. ILRG prepared 1-page handouts with project results, and distributed them to the Traditional Authority, GVHs, and CLC members, to help communicate program impacts back with participating communities, in line with best practice.

Ghana WEE: Using the updated Good Social Practices (GSP) training manual that was revised with support from ILRG, this quarter ECOM trained 1,862 farmers (808 men and 1,054 women), for a total of 2,646 unique farmers (1,213 men and 1,433 women). ECOM provided training on land rights to 1,256 farmers (536 men, 720 women), for a cumulative total of 1,973 farmers (847 men, 1,126 women). In addition to the in-person training sessions, audio training messages were broadcasted in 17 communities through radio, reaching an estimated total of 2,550 people. ECOM is scaling gender norms training for farmers into 29 new communities. ECOM trained 721 women on women’s empowerment and financial literacy, for a cumulative total of 1,402 women. ECOM supported the establishment of 52 village savings and loan associations (VSLAs) in 36 communities with 1,283 women and 35 men. VSLAs that ended their first cycle of savings-loans-repayment started or will soon start a new cycle, continuing to function well beyond ILRG’s time frame. Following a needs assessment completed in partnership with the Business Advisory Center (BAC), non-crop additional livelihoods training has been delivered to 849 women. A subcontractor is finalizing documents to support pathways for sustainability and scalability.
ECOM and ILRG gathered quantitative and qualitative data to assess impact.

WEE Cross-Cutting: Over 1,200 women were reached this quarter, and 328,000 women have been reached by WEE-funded activities so far. During this quarter the ILRG global Gender Advisor supported country teams and partners in collecting and analyzing quantitative and qualitative data on women’s land rights and WEE impact in Ghana, India, Malawi, Mozambique, and Zambia. This information will be used in learning products to be developed over the next quarter.

Madagascar: Work in Madagascar was completed last quarter with a webinar presentation to the USAID Mission. The work has continued into a second phase led by Helvetas, which as a result of ILRG support has fully integrated tenure into their project.

Other Activities: ILRG continued to develop the Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) online training module. ILRG finalized it support to USAID/Peru’s Indigenous Peoples Engagement Strategy.

Artisanal Mining and Property Rights Quarterly Progress Report April 1 – June 30, 2023

The USAID’s Artisanal Mining and Property Rights (AMPR) project Y5 Q3 report for FY2023 in the Central African Republic.

The Artisanal Mining and Property Rights (AMPR) project supports the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) to improve land and resource governance and strengthen property rights for all members of society, especially women. It serves as USAID’s vehicle for addressing complex land and resource issues around artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) in the Central African Republic (CAR) using a multidisciplinary approach. The project focuses primarily on diamond—and to a lesser extent, gold—production as well as targeted technical assistance to other USAID Missions and Operating Units (OUs) in addressing land and resource governance issues within the ASM sector. AMPR builds upon activities and lessons from the Property Rights and Artisanal Diamond Development (PRADD I and II) projects. The AMPR contract was signed on September 28, 2018, for an initial base period of three years with two option years, which were granted last year. The present report summarizes progress for Quarter 3 of AMPR’s fifth year of implementation.

Objective I of the project aims to strengthen CAR’s capacity to implement the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS) requirements. To launch the initiative, the AMPR team conducted a gap analysis and identified recommendations to stem the tide of rapidly expanding rough diamond smuggling and to remove barriers to implementing the Kimberley Process (KP) Operational Framework (OF). AMPR supports miner education, awareness raising, and capacity-building measures such as logistical support for local KP Focal Points and the strengthening of local monitoring committees. AMPR is also designing the conceptual framework for piloting decentralized artisanal mining zones (Zones d’Exploitation Artisanale [ZEAs]) with innovations for local revenue management while examining lessons learned and opportunities for miner parcel certification.

Objective 2 strengthens social cohesion and economic development in diamond mining communities. AMPR is building upon lessons learned from PRADD II and expanding local structures and processes for fostering peace and reconciliation. AMPR supports the expansion of local peace and reconciliation committees (Comités Locaux de Paix et Réconciliation [CLPRs]), as well as their efforts to monitor and resolve conflicts and conduct peacebuilding activities. The project is continuing efforts to foster coordination between the government ministries responsible for mining and peacebuilding. Finally, AMPR supports livelihoods activities for women as part of a comprehensive Gender Action Plan to promote women’s economic and social inclusion.

Objective 3 focuses on understanding the artisanal gold supply chain. AMPR, in partnership with the International Peace Information Service (IPIS) and RESOLVE, implemented a baseline assessment of the gold supply chain and created an interactive online map of artisanal gold mining sites. AMPR organized a workshop to present results from the study and facilitate training and discussion aimed at moving toward a national gold action plan. In Y4, AMPR commissioned a study to generate recommendations for improving gold commercialization and export systems in CAR.

Objective 4 involves responding to USAID’s requests for technical assistance with respect to understanding the linkages between ASM and development issues. One recent example is AMPR’s evaluation of the PRADD II project in Côte d’Ivoire, which concluded in 2018. The AMPR project is implementing activities in close coordination with other donors, especially the World Bank (WB) and the European Union (EU), that also have activities in the sector. The project will foster synergies and avoid duplication through local coordination and regular calls between donors.

Artisanal Mining and Property Rights Quarterly Progress Report January 1 – March 31, 2023

Introduction and Background

The USAID’s Artisanal Mining and Property Rights (AMPR) project Y5 Q2 report for FY2023 in the Central African Republic

The Artisanal Mining and Property Rights (AMPR) project supports the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) to improve land and resource governance and strengthen property rights for all members of society, especially women. It serves as USAID’s vehicle for addressing complex land and resource issues around artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) in the Central African Republic (CAR) using a multidisciplinary approach. The project focuses primarily on diamond — and to a lesser extent, gold — production as well as targeted technical assistance to other USAID Missions and Operating Units (OUs) in addressing land and resource governance issues within the ASM sector. AMPR builds upon activities and lessons from the Property Rights and Artisanal Diamond Development (PRADD I and II) projects. The AMPR contract was signed on September 28, 2018, for an initial base period of three years with two option years, which were granted last year. The present report summarizes progress during AMPR’s quarter 1 of the fifth year of project implementation.

Objective I of the project aims to strengthen CAR’s capacity to implement the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS) requirements. To launch the initiative, the AMPR team conducted a gap analysis and identified recommendations to stem the tide of rapidly expanding rough diamond smuggling and to remove barriers to implementing the Kimberley Process (KP) Operational Framework (OF). AMPR supports miner education, awareness-raising, and implementing capacity-building measures such as logistical support for local KP Focal Points and the strengthening of local monitoring committees. AMPR is also designing the conceptual framework for piloting decentralized artisanal mining zones (Zones d’Exploitation Artisanale, ZEAs) with innovations for local revenue management while also examining lessons learned and opportunities for miner parcel certification.

Objective 2 strengthens social cohesion and economic development in diamond mining communities. AMPR is building upon lessons learned from PRADD II and expanding local structures and processes for fostering peace and reconciliation. AMPR supports the expansion of local peace and reconciliation committees (Comités Locaux de Paix et Réconciliation [CLPRs]), as well as their efforts to monitor and resolve conflicts and conduct peacebuilding activities. The project is continuing efforts to foster coordination between the government ministries responsible for mining and peacebuilding. Finally, AMPR supports livelihoods activities for women as part of a comprehensive Gender Action Plan to promote women’s economic and social inclusion.

Objective 3 focuses on understanding the artisanal gold supply chain. AMPR, in partnership with the International Peace Information Service (IPIS) and RESOLVE, implemented a baseline assessment of the gold supply chain and created an interactive online map of artisanal gold mining sites. AMPR organized a workshop to present results from the study and facilitate training and discussion aimed at moving toward a national gold action plan. In Y4, AMPR commissioned a study to generate recommendations for improving gold commercialization and export systems in CAR.

Objective 4 involves responding to USAID’s requests for technical assistance with respect to understanding the linkages between ASM and development issues. One recent example is AMPR’s evaluation of the PRADD II project in Côte d’Ivoire, which concluded in 2018.

The AMPR project is implementing activities in close coordination with other donors, especially the World Bank (WB) and the European Union (EU), who also have activities in the sector. The project will foster synergies and avoid duplication through local coordination and regular calls between donors.

Integrated Land and Resource Governance (ILRG) Quarterly Report January – March 2023

Key Accomplishments and Challenges

Mozambique: During this quarter, several implementing partners were able to make significant progress on association recognition and land delimitation, but Cyclone Freddy caused delays across all activities. The Madal agricultural extension initiative and the delimitation of neighboring communities outside of Quelimane were both fully stopped for two weeks while the implementers and the communities focused entirely on recovery from the storm and flooding. Up to 90 percent of homes in the communities next to Madal were destroyed, and a large portion of crops that had been planted in the Madal activity were devastated. However, all service providers quickly took stock of the damage and modified their plans, and work was back underway at the end of March.

Zambia: In the lands sector, ILRG launched the Zambia Customary Land Administration System (ZCLAS) with five chiefs and began training customary land clerks in its operations. Partnership with the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources (MLNR) resulted in the public launch of the Ministry’s communications strategy. On gender integration, ILRG brought together three cohorts of women’s leadership and empowerment training members focused on land and wildlife. ILRG also entertained a request from the Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW) to carry out women’s leadership and empowerment training with all extension officers next quarter. Through the Zambia Community Resources Board Association (ZCBRA), ILRG began the roll out of both governance training manuals, as well as a leadership program for Community Resources Board (CRB) members, each of which is being requested and used nationally by civil society. ILRG hosted Second Gentleman, Doug Emhoff, during the Vice President’s visit to Zambia with three women community scouts sharing their experience of employment in a male dominated sector.

Ghana Deforestation-Free Cocoa: While this work has been completed, ILRG is preparing for a May 2023 communications and learning trip to examine how the momentum from the engagements has resulted in lasting impacts through Hershey and Ecom Agroindustrial Corp (ECOM).

India: ILRG continued to support women farmers during the peak potato season and harvest. ILRG provided agronomy training to women farmers in 11 communities and supported PepsiCo Agronomists, delivering training to women independently in 37 communities. ILRG provided ongoing support to seven women’s land leasing groups and 11 women-led demonstration farms, organizing Farmers’ Field Days for men and women farmers. ILRG provided ongoing training and mentoring to all CAs and Field Agronomists (FAs), including refresher training on gender equality and data collection. Despite challenges with seed quality across West Bengal this season, initial reports indicate that yield was satisfactory. As this is the final year of intervention, ILRG is focusing on data collection, including a post-season survey with women farmers and collecting qualitative data with men and women farmers, aggregators, and PepsiCo staff. The project-level Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (Pro-WEAI) endline data was collected and analyzed, and a subcontractor is conducting the final business case analysis and reporting ahead of the final event planned for the next quarter.

Liberia: In Liberia, ILRG completed support to the community lands protection process in five communities in Nimba County through a grant to Green Advocates International (GAI). The community lands protection process continues in eight communities in Grand Bassa and Bong Counties via a grant to Foundation for Community Initiatives (FCI). As boundaries were not finalized in all Nimba County communities, GAI will continue support to the five communities under USAID Liberia’s Land Management Activity.

Malawi: ILRG concluded work this quarter supporting the customary land documentation process with the Government of Malawi Land Reform Implementation Unit (LRIU) in Traditional Authority (TA) Mwansambo in Nkhotakota District. In total, 8,392 household level certificates were produced: 44 percent jointly registered, 32 percent registered to men only, and 24 percent registered to women only. These certificates secure customary land rights for 42,620 people (49 percent women). To date, 800 certificates have been distributed in three Group Village Headperson areas (GVHs). To mark the beginning of distribution, representatives from the government of Malawi, including Minister of Lands Deus Gumba, and USAID/Malawi, led by Acting Deputy Mission Director Anna Toness, attended a symbolic customary land certificate distribution ceremony in GVH Chaola in March. The ILRG gender consultant facilitated a community level learning event bringing together local and district stakeholders to reflect on lessons learned during the customary land documentation process.

Ghana WEE: During this quarter, ECOM developed a 2023 implementation plan for their gender equity and social inclusion (GESI) strategy and a standard operational procedure for gender-responsive and socially inclusive farmer engagement. It also provided refresher and additional GESI training to field staff. To internalize and sustain GESI activities, ECOM is piloting the gender norms change training through village savings and loan associations (VSLAs) in areas under projects supported by chocolate brands Lindt and Nestle. ILRG engaged a subcontractor to work on three pathways for such sustainability and scalability: synergies with chocolate brands; GESI integration blueprint for other ECOM origins and a case study on ECOM Ghana. Using the updated good social practices (GSP) training manual that was revised with support from ILRG, this quarter ECOM trained 1,685 farmers (789 men and 896 women), for a total of 2,045 farmers (937 men and 1,108 women). To complement training efforts and reach more farmers, ECOM organized alternative activities, such as broadcasting messages on gender-based violence (GBV) through community information centers and organizing a community cooking competition for men. Men’s fears about women owning land and low participation of men farmers in training were key challenges. ECOM provided empowerment and entrepreneurship to 801 women this quarter, for a total of 1,147. Forty-six women’s VSLAs with 1,201 women collected a total of United States dollars (USD) 48,104 in savings (USD 5,054 this quarter) and disbursed USD 39,225 (USD 9,447 this quarter). Women continue to receive support to cultivate chili and maize as alternative crops. ECOM partnered with the Business Advisory Center (BAC) to carry out needs assessments with
women’s VSLAs to identify alternative livelihood activities for women. The BAC will provide training on these activities over the next quarter.

WEE Cross-Cutting: This quarter 96,440 women were reached, and 342,959 women have been reached by WEE-funded activities so far. The ILRG global Gender Advisor continued to provide technical support to local gender and social inclusion advisors, implementing partners, and grantees across all ILRG countries. WEE cross-cutting communications efforts were centered around International Women’s Day, with ILRG publishing a blog post on women’s land rights and participating in a virtual side event during the 67th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW67).

Madagascar: During this quarter, ILRG supported the Major Concentrated Land Domain Operation (Opération Domaniale Concertée [ODOC]) land titling initiative carried out by the Ministère de l’Aménagement du Territoire et des Services Fonciers; a stakeholder evaluation carried out between Comité de Gestion du Bassin Sambirano and ministry staff; launch of the Ambanja women’s land rights union through association with Association FIVEDISAB (Fikambanana Vehivavy Distrika Sambirano Bemazava). Helvetas Intércoopération won a five-year award for the second phase of Climate Resilient Cocoa Landscapes (CRCL) project centered around a key component on land governance, leveraging ILRG’s technical engagement to date.

Other Activities: ILRG continued to complete analytical work related to private sector commitments to reducing deforestation, as well as on sustainable landscapes and land and resource governance overlaps in USAID programming. ILRG also continued to develop the free, prior, and informed consent (FPIC) online training module. ILRG incorporated feedback on USAID/Peru’s Indigenous Peoples Engagement Strategy from the public comment period which will be finalized next quarter.